Pedal on Parliament 2019 recap

I’m a bit late getting this recap post up but that shouldn’t be interpreted as an unsuccessful event. This year’s Pedal on Parliament was the best I’ve been to and this was largely due to the different route we did. Instead of cycling in one direction from A to B we cycled a circuit around the centre of town.

We all met outside Marischal College at 11am on Sunday and cycled first down Upper Kirkgate, then left onto Union Terrace, left onto Union Street, left onto Broad Street and back to Marischal College. We cycled this circuit over and over for one hour. I think I cycled 6 or 7 laps. I lost count at about 5. Others probably cycled more because I do remember being overtaken a few times.

There were just over 100 of us – people from Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire, of all ages, shapes, and sizes and riding all kinds of bikes. There were cargo bikes, electric bikes, tandem bikes, and even a couple of cool-looking Eliptigos. There were children with the youngest being 6 years old.

Erkine Logan Photography took some wonderful photos of the event and I’ve been given permission to share some of these.

Here’s a group shot:

Some of the children (and adults!) helped spread the message using chalk:

On the Monday after Pedal on Parliament we were featured in a double-page spread in the Evening Express.

Was it a success? In terms of enjoyment value, definitely! Will we see positive action from the local authority? If I didn’t think it would help then I wouldn’t bother and I would give up all hope. I do think these events are important and collectively, with other campaigns, they will help to steer direction towards an Aberdeen that is a safe place to cycle for everyone, adults and children alike.

What’s next for Aberdeen Cycle Forum? We’ve had a great year so far with the King Street Design Competition and Pedal on Parliament. Later this month we’ll be meeting with the Aberdeen City Council to hand over the winning designs from the King Street Design Competition and get an update on the Union Street bike path petition. We also received some funding from LUSH for an exciting new project! Make sure you subscribe to our blog to hear updates about this.

Annual cycle count

On May 14-16th we’ll be carrying out our annual cycle count, something we’ve done since 2008.  The data is really useful and does show that cycling in Aberdeen has increased over the last 10 years – but not by nearly enough!   We rely on volunteers to undertake the count and need 16 people in total.  If you can spare a couple of hours early-morning (07:00-09:00) on either 14, 15 or 16thMay, please get in touch info@aberdeencycleforum.org.uk

The count locations are listed below and if you let us know your preference, we’ll do our best to work with that and get back to you with a recording form and other details.  The 2 hours can also be split up between any of the 3 days if that makes it more attractive.

Auchmill Rd (nr Chalmers bakery in Bucksburn)
Deeside Line (nr Holburn St turn off)
George St (junc with Hutcheon St)
Grammar School (junc Carden Place/Esslemont Ave)
Kings St (junc with Mounthooly Way)
Great Western Rd (Mannofield; junc with Countesswells Rd)
Queens Rd (junc with Springfield Rd)
Shell Path (junc with Abbotswell Rd)
Union St (junc with Union Terrace)
Victoria Bridge/Market St
Westburn Rd/Argyll Place
Riverside Drive Path
Ellon Road (junc with North Donside Rd)
Tillydrone (near Coningham Terrace)
Parkway (junc Scotstown Rd)
Formartine & Buchan Way (at Dyce Station)

pexels-photo-1010973.jpeg
Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

Join us for a mass bike ride in Aberdeen on April 28th for #PoP2019

Where: Marischal College, Broad Street, Aberdeen
When: 28th April 2019 at 11am

The Aberdeen Cycle Forum is planning a ride in the centre of our city at the end of this month to highlight the need for segregated cycling infrastructure in Aberdeen. It’s not good enough to put cyclists in bus lanes or to erect share and care signs. To make cycling accessible for everyone we need segregated cycling infrastructure. The question we need to ask ourselves is, “Can an unaccompanied 12-year-old cycle safely here?” and if the answer is no, we have work to do.

We’ll be meeting at 11am outside Marischal College and cycling a circuit, going down Upperkirgate first. You can ride the circuit as many times as you like and can go at whatever pace is comfortable. With hundreds of us all cycling together it will be safe because of the safety in numbers effect.

Feel free to dress-up or decorate your bike. This is a demonstration about the lack of infrastructure for cycling but we want it to be fun at the same time.

King Street cycleway designs

I’m thrilled to be able to finally announce the winners of The King Street Design Competition. We had some fantastic entries including from as far away as the United States. We also had some amazing designs from pupils at our very own Seaton Primary School. I think transport officers at Aberdeen City Council could learn a thing or two from Seaton Primary School students.

We are in the process of posting/giving the Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative vouchers to the winners and will also hand over the winning designs to the Aberdeen City Council.

I’m so impressed with the designs we received. A lot of thought has gone into them. Here are the winners in the adults category.

In first place is Mark Philpotts from City Infinity. You can view the full concept as a pdf here. Mark has clearly designed something with cyclists in mind. He’s also incorporated a ‘boarder’ design to accommodate both bus stops and cycle tracks.

In second place is Christopher Wyatt with the following design. Christopher has included a bus gate on West North Street for his design. The idea for this is to prevent general traffic from making a right turn onto King Street while preserving access for buses and emergency vehicles. He’s also made use of floating bus stops. You can see Christopher’s full design here.

In the children’s category we have 6-year-old Noa in first place. We love that Noa has considered the visually impaired in his design.

For 2nd place we have a tie between Ava:

And Halo:

Thank you to everyone who entered and to our team of judges. Thanks also to Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative for donating the vouchers. The designs prove that no space is too challenging and with a bit of creativity and good design principles we can make Aberdeen a place where active travel is encouraged.

Submit your design for a bike path on King Street, Aberdeen

King Street in Aberdeen is long, reasonably flat, and connects the University of Aberdeen with the city centre. However it’s congested, polluted, and frightening to cycle along. We think it should have a segregated bike path but we recognise there are challenges to putting cycling infrastructure on existing roads – what happens at bus stops and junctions? Should the cycle path be two-way on one side of the road or one-way on each side? How much space needs to be taken from motor vehicles?

We want to know what YOU think and so we’re inviting people from the community of all ages and backgrounds to submit designs for how King Street could look with a segregated bike path. There are three vouchers from Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative up for grabs for the winning entries which will be judged at the end of February by a panel of independent judges.

If you’d like to enter, head over to the competition site at https://kingstreet.awardsplatform.com/

The competition closes on the 15th February 2019 at 5pm UTC.

A segregated bike path on King Street will be a boon for Aberdeen because it will make the city more attractive to students and university staff, increasing student numbers in the long term and helping to attract and retain talented staff. With more people cycling it will also reduce congestion and pollution in the area and increase health and well-being. Ultimately we’d like to see a segregated path that connects the University of Aberdeen with Robert Gordon University.

The winning designs will be showcased on our website and submitted to the Aberdeen City Council. Obviously we can’t force the Aberdeen City Council to implement the designs but they will feed into the council’s SUMP (Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan).

Air pollution campaign event

Every morning I walk our children to the local primary school. We like walking because a bit of exercise helps you prepare for the day and there’s evidence that children who walk to school do better in class due to cognitive improvements from the physical activity.  However we can smell the pollution from motor vehicles on our morning commute and it’s not just unpleasant, it’s toxic to our bodies and particularly harmful to young children’s bodies. Much of the pollution comes from parents who are driving their children to school. As parents we mean well and want the best for our children but the harm from pollution is not well recognised or understood and many parents do not realise that they’re causing children harm.

It’s for this reason we want to spread the word about pollution and the harm it causes as well as supporting our local authority in taking effective action to tackle the problem. We want the Aberdeen City Council to introduce low emission zones in the most polluted areas of Aberdeen. A low emission zone is one where the most polluting vehicles are banned. We also want to encourage active travel by investing in infrastructure like pedestrian walkways and cycle paths.

If this is something you support then please come along to the air pollution campaign event on 25th November. We are meeting in the paved area outside Marks and Spencer on Sunday 25th November from 12-2pm.

Councillor Martin Ford accepts Designing for Cycle Traffic

This morning we handed over one of the crowd-funded copies of Designing for Cycle Traffic to the Aberdeenshire Council. We met with Councillor Martin Ford at the start of the new cycle track at Kintore beside the A96. The new path goes all the way to Port Elphinstone and there are plans to extend it in the other direction to Blackburn.

 

Cllr Ford seemed pleased to accept the book and wants to increase active travel in the region through investment in the right infrastructure. We recognise that designing for cycling is challenging, especially after decades of prioritising cars, which is why we hope this book will be helpful.

We want cycling to be inclusive and something anyone can do including women, children, men, the elderly, and people with disabilities. But to reach this goal we need the right infrastructure and with the right infrastructure we can open up cycling to groups of people who otherwise wouldn’t do it.

Cycling can reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, lower pollution levels in the air we breathe, improve our mental and physical health, lower road maintenance and parking costs, reduce congestion, and if you cycle as part of your daily commute, you can eat that second piece of cake, guilt-free. What’s not to love about that?

Help us buy Designing for Cycle Traffic for our local councils

When our local authorities design for cycling the design is often very poor: they put cyclists in shared spaces, make them dismount at intersections, or paint an inadequate line that pushes cyclists into the gutter. The Institute of Engineers (ICE) have published a book on Designing for Cycle Traffic: International principles and practice. This book by John Parkin recognises that a “bicycle is a vehicle capable of speed”. We’d like to purchase two copies of this book and give one to the Aberdeen City Council and the other to the Aberdeenshire Council.

Here are some quotes from an article about the book:

  • Shared use footways are perhaps the classic example [of poor attempts to reduce perceived or actual risk]: they create problems of their own and have no regard for cycle design speed.
  • The most important principle any designer should recognise is that ‘the bicycle is a vehicle capable of speed’. This should be etched onto the desk of every designer because its implications are huge.
  • The cycle rider is exposed to the environment through which they travel. This means that the environment has to be designed to be comfortable and attractive, and this can be achieved by careful alignment planning, and appropriate treatments.
  • A recognised significant reason limiting cycling uptake is the dominating presence of motor traffic, and motor traffic also has other negative impacts on the liveability of cities generally, such as land take, noise and pollution. Lower speed limits (20mph) may help reduce speed. To reduce volume, and create space for cycle traffic, re-engineering of area-wide traffic management schemes needs to take place. Cycle routes themselves need to be part of a comprehensive network of routes.

We are already nearly half-way to reaching the cost of one book. If you can help with a fiver or more then please visit the Go Fund Me page to donate:

https://www.gofundme.com/designing-for-cycle-traffic-books

It would be great to hand these over before the end of October. Our urban planners and politicians keep talking about how they want to “lock in” the benefits of the AWPR and they won’t be able to do that without cycling infrastructure. Let’s make sure that whatever they do is well designed for cycling.

Listen to a podcast about the book here.

 

New Chair and Campaigns and Communications Secretary

We are pleased to announce that the Aberdeen Cycle Forum has a new Chair and a new Campaigns and Communications Secretary. Gavin Clark was appointed chair at the September meeting. Here’s his bio:

Gavin Clark


I’ve been involved with the Forum to a greater or lesser extent since its early days, becoming Secretary in 2015 and now Chair/Convenor.

I’ve lived in Aberdeen since 1996, but having grown up just 40 miles away I’m almost a proper local. My first memories of cycling here, as a student in the early 1980s, are of being knocked off by a right-turning car on George St, and of having a wheel stolen from my bike outside the University. Unfortunately those are experiences which students today are still likely to have!

To me, cycling is a cheap and reliable way to get around the city but also my main hobby, taking off on longer rides into Aberdeenshire’s beautiful countryside most weekends. Of course it keeps me fit and as I work for an environmental agency, the benefits of ‘clean’ travel aren’t lost on me either.

I’m lucky that half of my 3 mile daily commute is on traffic-free routes: the stretch along the River Dee opposite Duthie Park is a favourite part of my commute. But I know that cycling in the city and being mixed up in traffic can be a very unpleasant, off-putting and sometimes dangerous experience. I’d love to see that change, and in reality it has to if more people are going to get on their bikes more often.


Rachel Martin has taken on the role of Campaigns and Communications Secretary. Here’s her bio:

Rachel Martin

I’m originally from Australia but love the climate, culture, and scenery of Scotland and feel lucky to call Aberdeen my home since 2014. I got my first taste of commuter cycling as a 19-year-old living in Cambridge, UK. I was struck by how much it enhanced my quality of life – the freedom, the exercise, the independence – and have tried to recreate that in all the places I’ve lived since then.

When my children came along cycling became more challenging. Being a parent changes our perception of risk and how much risk we’re prepared to accept. My children are 11 and 8 years old and perfectly capable of riding their own bikes but our unsafe roads mean I ferry them around Aberdeen on a cargo bike. This is why I got involved in cycling advocacy: I want my children to be safe cycling around our city.

We are a car-free family who walk and cycle everywhere. For longer trips we take the train or book a car-club car. I love that active travel gives us exercise everyday without having to make a special effort to fit exercise in. It’s also free and doesn’t produce any toxic emissions. But more than any other reason, cycling is fun and I hope I’m still doing it when I’m 90.


The role of secretary is currently vacant. If anyone would like to take this on then please contact us or come to our next monthly meeting on Tuesday 30th October at 7:30pm. Venue TBA.